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Memory Loss

Alzheimer's / Dementia

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The Alzheimer's Association defines dementia as a collective term for disorders marked by the progressive decline in cognitive and mental abilities, severe enough to interfere with daily life.

 

Many dementias are progressive, meaning symptoms start out slowly and gradually get worse. While symptoms of dementia can vary greatly, at least two of the following core mental functions must be significantly impaired to be considered dementia: 

  • Memory

  • Reasoning and judgment

  • Visual perception

  • ​Communication and language

  • Ability to focus and pay attention

P300 brain potential is sensitive to Alzheimer’s disease processes during its early stages, and can aid in the diagnosis of dementia and may help in the assessment of early Alzheimer’s disease, finding potential markers of Alzheimer’s years before symptom onset. Through routine EEG brain scans, detection in decreasing P300 amplitude can indicate a cognitive decline, and intervention can be administered if the noticeable change is worry-some.  Many measurements (P300 latencies, P300 amplitudes, reaction times, frequency states, coherence) correlated significantly with important preventative care and heart-function markers.

 

As personalized health is one of the fastest-growing specialties worldwide, the aspirations focused on quality-of-life management are to keep physical and mental functioning high throughout life. Well-versed in therapies to manage, and age-related mental declines (declines that are otherwise considered to be a part of normal aging), many are dissatisfied with the limited set of tools available for managing these ailments. Currently, there is a need for a low-cost, easy-to-use and reliable in-office device to objectively monitor brain function longitudinally, where past reports can be viewed against those over various points in the aging process.

 

Dementia is not a specific disease and there are several different types of dementia. Examples include Alzheimer's disease, Vascular dementia, Dementia from Parkinson's disease and similar disorders, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Frontotemporal dementia (Pick's disease), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.​

Think of differentiating Alzheimer's vs dementia similar to headaches vs. migraines, or the saying, "all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares". Alzheimer's is the most common cause of dementia (60%-80% occurrence) and progressive disease, with the greatest known risk factor increasing age. Alzheimer's has no current cure, but treatments for symptoms are available and research continues.​

Dementia is caused by damage to brain cells. This damage interferes with the ability of brain cells to communicate with each other. When brain cells cannot communicate normally, thinking, behavior, and feelings can be affected. There is no one test to determine if someone has dementia. Doctors diagnose Alzheimer's and other types of dementia based on a careful medical history, a physical examination, laboratory tests, and the characteristic changes in thinking, day-to-day function, and behavior associated with each type.

Doctors diagnose Alzheimer's and other types of dementia based on a careful medical history, a physical examination, laboratory tests, and the characteristic changes in thinking, day-to-day function, and behavior associated with each type.

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